Flawton Wildlife Croft,

Acknowledgements and thanks.

In 1991, when the Tenancy for Flawton Croft became available, I approached the Croft Commission for that assignment.

As a lifelong conservationist and naturalist, I saw and grasped at the idea of wildlife conservation on Shetland. Flawton was remote and relatively un-spoilt. I was asked by the Croft commission to draw up a plan of action and forward it to themselves for approval or otherwise.

I natural contacted the real wildlife experts of Shetland and received fantastic support and encouragement.

I firstly thank the late Bobby Tulloch, Francis Walterson and Walter Scott. The offered unstinting support and massive advice.

Further to those gentlemen, I contacted the relevant Science Departments of the top Universities in Scotland and my home College, Kings London.

I received a vast amount of encouragement and information, all my ideas were reviewed, criticized where necessary and amended.

Only then could I approach The Croft Commission with written testament from various Professors and University Heads of Departments with a wildlife plan for Flawton. My plans and ideas were accepted and Flawton Croft Tenancy assigned to me.

I received no help whatsoever from Shetland Island Council nor for that matter from the then Department of Agriculture and Fisheries. Sadly all the could advise was to keep sheep and their attitude towards a conservation project was dismissive and sadly ignorant!!

Further Developments.

The Croft Tenancy was reassigned from myself, Ian Tinkler, to my daughter Shona Tinkler, now Shona Stove, in the mid-1990s.

Shona is a Higher Honours Graduate in Biological Sciences and is like me passionate about wildlife and conservation.

Shona and her husband Frank intend to continue the wilding of the Croft for conservation purposes with the posable introduction of rare breeds of domestic stock in the future.

Frank is a highly qualified Stone Mason with extensive knowledge of trees and woodland management and habitat.